Call for Papers: War and population movements in the Ottoman Empire (14th-18th century)

Bettina Severin-Barboutie in cooperation with Corine Defrance and Catherine Horel

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International workshop of the Laboratoire d’excellence « Écrire une histoire nouvelle de l’Europe » (EHNE)

Location: Turkologentag 2016. Second European Convention on Turkic, Ottoman and Turkish Studies, Hamburg, 2016, 14-17 September

Organisation: Dr. Bettina Severin-Barboutie (DHI Paris/Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne), Prof. Corine Defrance (CNRS UMR SIRICE 8138-LABEX EHNE), Prof. Catherine Horel (CNRS UMR SIRICE 8138-LABEX EHNE)

Deadline for the proposals: January 15, 2016

Please submit your abstract (300-500 words) in English or German and a short CV, including your active and passive language skills, by email to OEmovementandwar@gmail.com. The deadline for proposal submissions is January 15, 2016. The organizing committee will make its decision in March 2016.

Details about the registration for the Turkologentag 2016. Second European Convention on Turkic, Ottoman and Turkish Studies: https://turkologentag2016.org/

Summary
The Ottoman Empire is one of the multi-ethnic, multi-confessional and transcontinental empires that, for centuries, shaped the history of Europe and the world. Despite their collapses, their effects can be felt up to the present day. The Ottoman Empire’s history is usually divided into two phases: its construction and consolidation from the 14th to the 17th century, and its decay and collapse from the 18th to the 20th century.

The military victories that enabled the expansion and consolidation of the Ottoman Empire in the early modern period, as well as the defeats that played a role in its decline and dissolution in the 19th and 20th centuries, led to the movements of hundreds of thousands, sometimes even millions, of people – both within the Ottoman Empire and beyond its borders – during the hostilities as well as before and after their cessation. Therefore, the history of the Ottoman Empire was also a history of war and mobility.

The workshop “War and population movements in the Ottoman Empire from the 14th to the 18th century” examines war-induced population movements during the growing phase of the Ottoman Empire. The aim of the event is to shed light on a number of case studies in order to stimulate reflection on questions of methodology, as well as other aspects of historical and inter-disciplinary approaches, by bringing together researchers from a variety of academic fields who work on these topics.

There are two other aims. First, that war and the Ottoman Empire should be understood as widely as possible in space and time. As such, we also welcome contributions about its expansion into North Africa. Second, the discussion of specific questions such as the meaning of population movements for Empire-building and their role in the transition from war to peace.

We are looking for papers from different disciplines which either question the issues outlined above or go beyond that. Papers should be no longer than 20 minutes. The workshop is the opening event of a two-session project. It will be followed by a conference in 2017 dealing with war-induced population movements in the Ottoman Empire from the 18thto the 20th century.
CfP in German (pdf): Krieg und Bevölkerungsbewegungen im Osmanischen Reich vom 14. bis zum 18. Jahrhundert

CfP in French (pdf): Guerre et mouvements de populations dans l’Empire ottoman (XIVe-XVIIIe siècles)

CfP in English (pdf): War and population movements in the Ottoman Empire (14th-18th century)

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